Homeschooling An Introvert

homeschooling the introverted child

I am the parent of six introverts.  I am strongly introverted so it’s no surprise that my kids are too.   Homeschooling an introvert is, in general, easier than homeschooling extroverts.  This is because two of the hallmarks of introverts are quietness and a desire to be at home.  Your extroverted children may clamor to go to school for the social life, but your introverted children will probably be much more content with the homeschool lifestyle.  Still there are a few pitfalls of this personality type that the homeschooling parent should watch for. What is an Introvert? An introvert needs quiet, alone time to recharge and feel comfortable and content.  Too much stimulus from their environment and they are going stir-crazy.  It’s like the opposite of cabin fever. Introverts are not necessarily shy.  Shyness is a fear of what other people think and say about you (or what you think they … Keep on reading

Playing Store For Math

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Learning about money is about more than just knowing what each coin and bill are worth, it’s about actually using money confidently to do everyday things.  Money is of course used primarily in financial transactions, especially when we go to the store.  So playing store for math makes sense. I’ve been doing math intervention, going back over basic principles of arithmetic with all four of my younger kids, because the older two were struggling with algebra.  You can read more about our math intervention. Money Basics First of all, kids need to know the basics.  You should learn or review these things before you begin this lesson. Names and values of coins and bills How to count money amounts How to count money amounts using different coins, like making 75 cents with 3 quarters or making 75 cents with 7 dimes and a nickle. How to make change.  The video … Keep on reading

Layers of Learning Unit 4-2

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History: Expanding Nation Geography: Pacific States Science: Motors & Engines The Arts: Tall Tales Description Make a Trail of Tears mobile as you learn about the expulsion of the Southwest tribes from their homes.   Go surfing for facts with our Hawaii surf board printable.  Build your own pop can hero engine as you learn about steam power.  Make your own illustrated map of Paul Bunyan’s exploits in America. Unit 4-1 has all of this and dozens more ideas to keep your kids learning with hands-on fun.  This is a PDF. In each unit study you’ll find a recommended library list, important background information about each topic, lots of activities to choose from for kids of all ages, and sidebars with a bunch more ideas including Additional Layers, Fabulous Facts, On The Web, Writer’s Workshop, Famous Folks, and Teaching Tips.  Printable maps and worksheets are included at the end of each unit … Keep on reading

Layers of Learning Unit 4-1

  History: American Government Geography: U.S.A. Science: Heat & Temperature The Arts: Patriotic Music Description Create your own government based on natural laws.  Craft a “filmstrip” page to show the parts of the Constitution.  Build a photo collage as you learn about the regions of the United States.  Monitor the temperature of a pot of heating water as it turn from solid to liquid to gas and learn about latent heat.    Play a guessing game as you listen to martial anthems of America.  Unit 4-1 has all of this and dozens more ideas to keep your kids learning with hands-on fun.  This is a PDF. In each unit you’ll find a recommended library list, important background information about each topic, lots of activities to choose from for kids of all ages, and sidebars with a bunch more ideas including Additional Layers, Fabulous Facts, On The Web, Writer’s Workshop, Famous Folks, and Teaching Tips.  … Keep on reading

Circuit Training With Kids

Circuit training with kids can be fun for them and you. The stations are short and the pace varies, keeping the interest of kids for the duration. I started doing circuit training with my kids this spring because three of them had Boy Scout merit badges or achievements they were working on for physical fitness.  The first day they whined a bit, but by the end of that first workout they were hooked. Here’s what we do First of all we have five stations each day because there are five of us, the four kids and me.  Then we rotate through the stations. Each rotation takes about 1 1/2 to 2 minutes. We vary the stations each day. But every day includes the running portion, that’s a given. The time for each rotation depends on the runner.  When the runner gets done with his course, we move to the next … Keep on reading

Antarctica

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Antarctica covers about 14 million square miles surrounding the south pole of the earth.  Because of its distance from the equator, it receives very little sunlight and it’s very cold there, too cold to support the growth of trees.   It’s much colder even than the North Pole.  The land is largely covered by ice.  It is mostly uninhabited, except for researchers and tourists.  Compared with other places on earth, it is very much an untouched continent.  Sir Peter Scott, founder of the WWF, said this about Antarctica: Antarctica is the only continent without any indigenous people.  It has no independent government and no economy.  It is governed only by an Antarctic treaty which many countries have signed and that governs how the land is used.  Thousands of scientists from all over the globe do research there, so even though we call it untouched as compared with other continents, the research facilities … Keep on reading

Learning to Write Number Words

How to teach kids to write number words.

Part of math, numbers, and math literacy is learning to spell and write number words.  Kids need to be able to write the words after being given a number written in digits and they need to be able to translate the written version into digits.   My kids are a bit older, but still struggling with a few of the words and word forms.  You can read about how we are learning math from the beginning.  They know the number words, mostly, but it is not fluid and automatic. They have to think still when they hit the thousands comma and the decimal and they forget the dash between the thirty and the four when writing thirty-four. And they still misspell some of the words.  So my plan is to drill it until it becomes automatic.  I wish I had done it from the beginning when they were learning all this … Keep on reading

Children’s Garden

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Several weeks ago my two youngest kids went out in the backyard with rakes and began to clear away the detritus from underneath some trees right by our back patio.  We’ve attempted to make it into a garden several times, but never had proper soil.  The weeds of north Idaho defeated us.  My laziness defeated us. But after the boys spent a couple of days raking and planning and picking up sticks and pulling weeds I didn’t have the heart to tell them I couldn’t be bothered.  So my husband went to some friends who have horses and got manure and I went to the garden store with the boys and picked out some plants. Getting the Grown-ups Involved We talked about annuals vs. perennials.  We also discussed how the area where they had planned their garden was shaded by some large poplar trees and so we would need shade … Keep on reading

US Postal Codes

US Postal Codes Cards

Postal codes, or postal abbreviations, are short hand ways to write the names of states when addressing letters.  But they are also used in advertising, legal information, on news weather reports and many other places.  Typically in the upper elementary years of school, 4th or 5th grade American kids are expected to memorize the postal codes of the United States. The US post office has decided on standard two letter abbreviations for each state so that when a letter is addressed the sender, the receiver, and the postal workers can all see at a glance where the letter is headed or where it came from. For example Maine is abbreviated ME.  The postal codes are always exactly two letters, always capitalized, and never with periods.  Most states are pretty easy to guess from their postal codes, but some might be confusing.  Is AK Alaska or Arkansas?  It is Alaska.  Arkansas … Keep on reading

Draw a Story Starters

One of the things I’ve been working on with my kids is just getting things down on paper when they are given a writing assignment.  They seem to have these mental blocks where they just stare at the paper. So I made these story starters to use during a timed “writing frenzy”.  Since you draw from four different idea bags, this method gives endless story starters. Before we start writing the kids chose one slip of paper from each of the baggies.  In one baggie is the topic, in another is the problem, in another is an adjective, and in the last is an object.  You can mix the cards around any way you like for your story.  In the cards drawn below, either the mom could be crazy or the math homework could be. The rule for our writing frenzy is that everyone has to write for the entire … Keep on reading